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Article
January 21, 1933

THE USE OF FRESH HUMAN SERUM (COMPLEMENT) IN MENINGOCOCCUS MENINGITISREPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.
From the Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, and the Pediatric Service of the New Haven Hospital and Dispensary.

JAMA. 1933;100(3):178-180. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740030026009
Abstract

In 1908 the successful treatment of ten out of sixteen cases of acute meningococcus meningitis by means of fresh human serum (without the addition of antiserum) given intraspinally was reported by McKenzie and Martin.1 They used normal, convalescent and patients' serums and extended their study by showing that each serum, in vitro, exerted a meningococcidal power by means of a thermolabile constituent. In 1916, Fairley and Stewart2 added fresh human (convalescent) serum to antimeningococcus serum before intraspinal administration and reported seven recoveries out of ten acute

cases thus treated. Two years later, Kolmer and his associates3 showed by well controlled experiments that the addition of normal active human or guinea-pig serum to antimeningococcus serum definitely increased its opsonic and to a lesser extent its bactericidal activity. Dr. Kolmer4 has informed us of five unreported cases of the successful clinical application of this principle. However, the literature

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