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Article
September 20, 1930

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF ANHYDREMIA IN EXTENSIVE SUPERFICIAL BURNS

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.
From the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Yale University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1930;95(12):852-857. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02720120020006
Abstract

The adequate management of a serious burn demands the skill and knowledge of both the physician and the surgeon. By reason of the emergent character of most burn cases and because of lack of knowledge relative to the newer conceptions of the nature of the processes underlying a burn, treatment is usually regarded as exceedingly difficult and unsatisfactory.

With the advance of industry, burns are becoming of greater frequency and consequently of greater importance to the practitioner. Their increased occurrence lays an obligation on the medical profession to become conversant with the fundamental conditions induced by a burn and to become familiar with the most efficient methods of treatment. It is not sufficient to treat the wounded area only. Much more important is the recognition of systemic effects and the immediate institution of proper treatment to combat these effects. "What does it profit a man if he dresses the wound

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