[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 4, 1933

THE THERAPEUTICS OF THE INTRAVENOUS DRIP

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; LOS ANGELES
From the Medical and Surgical Services, the Mount Sinai Hospital, and the Department of Pharmacology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

JAMA. 1933;100(5):305-310. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740050001001
Abstract

"The rapid intravenous introduction of pharmacologically active or inert chemicals, drugs and biologic fluids may frequently give rise to immediate and far-reaching nonspecific sequelae, at times serious and occasionally fatal."1 This syndrome ("speed shock") includes circulatory and respiratory symptoms, together with alterations in the blood. The reaction is immediate and may include or closely simulate such apparently unrelated phenomena as the anaphylactoid reaction,2 nitritoid and hemoclastic crises, post-transfusion reactions,3 peptone shock, and the sudden death that has been described following intravenous injections.4

These untoward reactions may be avoided by the slow continuous "intravenous drip."5 The clinical application of this principle is by no means new and has been emphasized by many clinicians.6

We have already described a convenient apparatus for the practical clinical application of the intravenous drip.7 A central room for the preparation of these intravenous sets was established at the Mount

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×