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Article
September 27, 1930

THE HUMAN CONSTITUTION IN ITS RELATION TO GASTRO-INTESTINAL DISORDERS

JAMA. 1930;95(13):905-910. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02720130001001
Abstract

From the earliest times, medical literature has abounded in various conceptions of the human constitution and diathesis, and considerable attention has been directed at certain periods to the importance of this factor in its relation to disease. Hippocrates, in his treatise on Airs, Waters, Place, pointed to this association; and in more recent times Laycock, Addison and Jonathan Hutchinson have noted a relationship between types of individuals and their susceptibility to certain diseases. For a time, however, interest was apparently lost in the study of the relation of hereditary characteristics to disease, and not until within recent years has renewed study again been directed to this important subject. This is clearly manifested by the extensive literature that has made its appearance within a comparatively short period. One need only point to the interesting publications of Aschner, Bauer, Bondi, Draper, Faber, Freund and von den Velden, Hoffman, Kraus, Kretschmer, Martius, Pearl,

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