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Article
September 27, 1930

EMPHYSEMA OF THE HEAD AND NECK COMPLICATING TONSILLECTOMY

Author Affiliations

East Orange, N. J.

JAMA. 1930;95(13):934-935. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.27210130001010
Abstract

A review of the literature gives one the impression that emphysema of the head and neck following tonsillectomy occurs infrequently. The youngest case found in the literature is that of a boy, aged 7, reported by Stein,1 and the only other cases reported occurring in children are those of a boy, aged 10, and a girl, aged 12, described by Richards.2

The following three cases occurred within a period of one year:

Case 1.  —J. F., a boy, aged 2 years, presented no abnormal conditions other than large infected tonsils and a moderate amount of adenoid tissue. He was a neurotic child and he screamed with fear when the anesthetic was administered. Following the removal of the right tonsil, considerable swelling of the right side of his face and scalp was noticed. Crepitation was present throughout this swollen area, and crepitation was readily elicited in the neck and

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