[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 18, 1933

PREVENTION OF CHILLS FOLLOWING TRANSFUSION OF CITRATED BLOOD

Author Affiliations

Surgeon, Mount Sinai Hospital; Hematologist and Associate in Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital NEW YORK

JAMA. 1933;100(7):466-469. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740070004002
Abstract

Eighteen years ago, one of us (R. L.) suggested a simplified method of blood transfusion; namely, the citrate method. It can be stated without exaggeration that this method represents the simplest and easiest procedure. In fact, the great popularity that blood transfusion enjoys today is based on the introduction of the citrate method into the medical armamentarium.

With the popularization of this method, blood transfusion has been put within reach of every physician and surgeon. Blood transfusion up to that time had been confined to a small number of well equipped hospitals. The use of citrated blood has been rendered possible in small communities and its life-saving value made applicable to a large number of patients.

When this method was introduced, many objections were brought forward against its clinical efficacy. It was claimed that the vitality of the erythrocytes and leukocytes was impaired by the mixture of the blood with

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×