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March 11, 1933

ELECTROGALVANIC LESIONS OF THE ORAL CAVITY PRODUCED BY METALLIC DENTURES

Author Affiliations

Professor of Dermatology and Radiology, University of Oklahoma School of Medicine OKLAHOMA CITY
From the Department of Dermatology and Radiology, University of Oklahoma School of Medicine, and the Lain-Roland Clinic.

JAMA. 1933;100(10):717-720. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740100011004
Abstract

In a previous communication I1 discussed lesions of the oral cavity caused by electrogalvanic discharges between dissimilar metallic dentures and reported thirty consecutive cases measured for electric current. Since that time I have been privileged to make a careful study of more than 300 additional cases which contained various dissimilar metallic dentures. From this study, I feel justified in forming certain definite conclusions.

I have confirmed, by repeated experiments, that human saliva, whether acid, alkaline or neutral, makes a good electrolyte through which metallic electrons freely circulate from a higher to a lower electropotentiality. Thus, within every oral cavity which contains dentures such as plates, bridges, crowns, or fillings of dissimilar elemental consistency, there is constituted a complete galvanic battery.

This newly discovered oral cavity phenomenon is in keeping with a fundamental law of electrophysics discovered by Galvani in 1786—later verified by Volta— which declares that when dissimilar metals

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