[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 11, 1933

ARSENIC POISONING CAUSED BY A MOUTHWASH CONTAINING SOLUTION OF POTASSIUM ARSENITE

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

JAMA. 1933;100(10):737-738. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.27420100002012c
Abstract

D. G., a white girl, aged 10 years, was admitted, July 20, 1932, with Vincent's infection of the mouth of eleven days' duration. Symptoms of note prior to admission included anorexia, fetor oris, fever and anuria. Bitter complaint of vomiting and gagging, continuous nausea and inability to retain anything, even water, was made by the mother. The patient had received an injection of Thio-Bismol (sodium bismuth thioglycollate) into the buttock, a local application of neoarsphenamine (0.4 Gm. in aqueous solution), and the following mouthwash:

On admission the temperature, pulse and respiration were 98.6, 100 and 25, respectively. The blood pressure was 106 systolic, 70 diastolic. The prominent features on examination were a shallow lingual ulcer, moderate cervical lymphadenopathy and right-sided abdominal tenderness. The heart and lungs presented no abnormalities. There was no edema, and the eye-grounds were normal.

The admission diagnoses were: (1) Vincent's infection and (2) anuria (of unknown

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×