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Article
March 11, 1933

"MATERNITY WARDS IN GENERAL HOSPITALS": REPLY TO DRS. SKEEL AND RUNNELS

JAMA. 1933;100(10):761. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740100055031

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Abstract

To the Editor:  —I am gratified to learn that the Cleveland Hospital Obstetric Society (The Journal, February 25, p. 597) agrees with me on the main issue: "Actual physical separation and entirely separate personnel are essential to safety. Isolated separate labor and delivery rooms are necessary. The laundry of the maternity division should never be mixed with that of the medical and surgical floors, so that sheets, pillow cases, and the like that have been used by infected surgical patients cannot be sent from the laundry to the obstetric floor. No hospital has the moral right, and none should have the legal right, to accept cases for delivery without making physical and administrative preparation for their safe care." What more do I ask than this perfect separation? "I will concede that if the maternity ward of the general hospital were on a completely separated floor and that if the doctors,

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