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Editorial
August 4, 2015

Broadening the Approach to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and the Consequences of Trauma

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Medicine, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington
  • 2Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle
  • 3Center of Excellence in Substance Abuse Treatment and Education, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington
  • 4Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle
JAMA. 2015;314(5):453-455. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.7522

It is common for individuals to experience potentially life-threatening traumatic events over the course of their lives and subsequently to experience psychological distress associated with the traumatic events. Although most people recover from such distress without lasting consequences, some develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which, left untreated, may result in symptoms, such as nightmares, intrusive memories, and emotional numbing, that can last for decades.1

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