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Article
August 21, 1926

THE BEHAVIOR OF THE PYLORUS

Author Affiliations

Chicago. Director, Radiological Laboratories, Michael Reese Hospital.

JAMA. 1926;87(8):606. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680080072027

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Abstract

To the Editor:  —The editorial on "The Behavior of the Pylorus" (The Journal, July 31) states that "it is currently concluded from roentgen-ray evidence in animals and in man, and from experimental evidence in animals, that the pylorus is normally open at the height of antral contraction and that every antral contraction is normally followed by the discharge of chyme through the pylorus." My experience in a large number of cases is directly contrary to this statement. There is no question about the fact that the pylorus apparently is open at the height of antral contraction, yet it does not follow that the pylorus is open at the height of every antral contraction. It is a common occurrence to see four or five peristaltic waves in succession complete their cycle at the pylorus without any opaque medium passing through.

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