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Article
October 18, 1930

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF ADVANCED TUBERCULOUS INFECTION OF SCHOOL CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Henry Phipps Institute, University of Pennsylvania.

JAMA. 1930;95(16):1151-1158. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02720160011004
Abstract

Within the last five years, extensive studies by Opie and McPhedran,1 Chadwick,2 Rathbun,3 Myers,4 and Opie, Landis, McPhedran and Hetherington5 have demonstrated the widespread occurrence of grave tuberculous lesions in the lungs of children who do not seem to be sick and in many instances are well nourished and apparently in robust health. These children do not have the symptoms or physical signs usually associated with pulmonary tuberculosis. Tuberculous infection is discovered by the tuberculin test, and roentgenologic examination furnishes a measure of its severity by revealing the extent and character of the lesion. Within a short period a considerable amount of information has been accumulated concerning the clinical significance and probable outcome of the different lesions that are definable, but as yet this knowledge is incomplete and will be increased largely by observations continued for years, because the disease usually pursues a chronic course.

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