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Article
April 22, 1933

RESULTS OF THE WORK OF THE COMMISSION ON MEDICAL EDUCATION

Author Affiliations

Chancellor, University of Buffalo BUFFALO

JAMA. 1933;100(16):1217-1219. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740160001001
Abstract

Educational reforms can be brought about in a number of different ways. One way is by decree. That way is quick and relatively easy, provided agencies exist to issue and enforce the decree.

Up to twenty-five years ago, reform by decree had not been tried very extensively in America. The machinery for it was lacking. The federal government exercised no authority over education, and, except in a single state, no comprehensive scheme of state control had been developed. Indeed, the state's obligation to protect the public against malpractice in those professions that deal with health and property had only just been begun to be taken seriously. In attempting to afford this protection, however, the state concerned itself solely with the individual practitioner and not with the school that trained him.

Then suddenly, just about twenty-five years ago, the possibility of effecting educational reform by decree, even in the absence of

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