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Article
April 22, 1933

THE CHANGE PRODUCED IN FAT TISSUE BY THE USE OF INSULIN IN MALNUTRITION

Author Affiliations

Boston
From the Medical Service of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

JAMA. 1933;100(16):1235-1236. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.27420160001008
Abstract

The use of insulin to produce gain in weight in certain cases of nondiabetic malnutrition has proved of great value. The nature of the added weight, however, has been subject to speculation. Falta,1 who was the first to use insulin for this purpose in adults, believed that the added weight was not due to edema, because he gave theophylline to patients receiving the drug without producing any diuresis. On the other hand, Feissly2 thought that the administration of insulin caused first the development of increased turgor and subsequently the formation of fat. Contrary to what one might expect, Löw and Krčma3 found a decrease in the fat and carbohydrate content in the liver of insulinized rats and concluded from this that insulin directs the peroral fat to be stored in the fat depots. Recently, an extensive literature on the use of insulin in non-diabetic malnutrition has accumulated,

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