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Article
September 11, 1926

BERLIN

JAMA. 1926;87(11):864-865. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680110064027

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Abstract

The Emergency Medical Service of Berlin  The emergency medical service in Berlin consists of three subdepartments: (1) the emergency stations, (2) the ambulance service, and (3) information service on hospital beds. There are at present forty-two emergency stations, twenty-five of which are connected with hospitals of various kinds, while seventeen are independent centers. These emergency stations are provided with the necessary equipment for the rendering of first aid, but for extended treatment patients are sent elsewhere. The physician in charge not only treats patients in the emergency station itself but also responds to telephone calls or to summons by messenger. When called outside the station, the physician is equipped with a bag which contains all the medical instruments and bandages that he is likely to need in emergency cases. From patients who are able to pay, a suitable fee is exacted, but the aid given does not depend on the

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