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Article
September 11, 1926

Lactobacillus Acidophilus.

Author Affiliations
 

By Nicholas Kopeloff, Ph.D., Associate in Bacteriology, Psychiatric Institute, Ward's Island, N. Y. Cloth. Price, $5. Pp. 211, with illustrations. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins Company, 1926.

JAMA. 1926;87(11):871. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680110071042

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Abstract

The vicissitudes of sour milk therapy since the time when Metchnikoff first pronounced it a prime factor for the promotion of longevity have been many. Physicians have seen the passing of Bacillus bulgaricus into a well defined position not nearly so important as that originally accorded to it. They have also seen the coming on the scene of the acidophilus organism, and read numerous reports that brought its use almost to the status of a panacea. The book by Kopeloff is a well written account of the history of the subject, a review of investigations in the field, and a presentation of original studies by the author and his colleagues. It is, of course, concluded that such therapy has limited uses. Bacillus acidophilus is not a panacea, and it will not necessarily prolong life. It has, however, established virtues in the treatment of constipation, diarrhea, and some other less common

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