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Article
September 18, 1926

GROUP SUSCEPTIBILITY TO ACUTE, UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS

Author Affiliations

STANFORD UNIVERSITY, CALIF.

JAMA. 1926;87(12):920-922. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02680120030009
Abstract

A rather comprehensive review of the literature on the so-called common cold and upper respiratory tract infections of the influenzal type made by Townsend1 of the United States Public Health Service indicates that "there has been little advance in any knowledge concerning its etiology, epidemiology, periodicity, or the establishment of definite symptoms, pathognomonic in its diagnosis." It therefore would seem that any study of possible factors governing the susceptibility to "colds" is worth reporting, since even negative conclusions help at least to narrow the field of investigation.

Smiley2 of Cornell University in connection with a study of the incidence of "colds" among Cornell students, divided these men and women into three groups: (1) those having "colds" not at all or once a year; (2) those reporting two or three "colds" a year, and (3) those having four or more a year. A questionnaire was sent to groups 1

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