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Article
November 8, 1930

THE DIAGNOSIS OF TUMORS INVOLVING THE SPINAL CORD

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Clinical Neurology, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1930;95(19):1398-1402. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02720190010003
Abstract

I propose to limit my consideration of tumors involving the spinal cord to diagnosis, which is the phase of particular interest to medical men and which has, as its natural sequence, proper treatment. The patient's story is the most important step in diagnosis.

DIAGNOSIS 

Pain.  —The earliest and commonest complaint is pain. In more than 300 proved cases of tumor of the spinal cord at the Mayo Clinic, pain was present in approximately 80 per cent. The average duration of the symptom was well over two years. Frazier 1 noted the duration of the disease to be twenty-eight and fourtenths months. The pain may be in the spine at the site of the tumor; it may be referred to the lower extremities even when the tumor lies high in the canal, but usually it is referred along the distribution of a posterior root, when it is known as a root

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