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Article
November 8, 1930

PERFORATION OF THE CECUM BY A TOOTHPICK, SIMULATING ACUTE APPENDICITIS

JAMA. 1930;95(19):1424. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.27210190001009
Abstract

Intestinal perforation and resulting abscess formation due to an ingested foreign body have been mentioned recently in The Journal.1 An article by Bearse2 focused attention on the subject. The two outstanding characteristics of the abscesses have been their slow development with consequent large size, and their location in connection with the large intestine. An exception was the duodenal perforation reported by Douglas.3 The rectum is said to be the most common site for perforation by foreign bodies. A recent case coming to my attention presented rather different characteristics and offers another problem in differential diagnosis.

REPORT OF CASE  B. F., a man, aged 44, was admitted to the Union Memorial Hospital, April 20, 1930, under the surgical care of Dr. William A. Fisher, having been referred by Dr. Joseph W. Ketzky. On the previous day the patient had first noticed a dull pain in the right side

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