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Editorial
September 8, 2015

Antenatal Iron Use in Malaria Endemic SettingsEvidence of Safety?

Author Affiliations
  • 1Center for Human Nutrition, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 2Institute for International Programs, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
JAMA. 2015;314(10):1003-1005. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.10032

Anemia related to iron deficiency during pregnancy occurs in 19% of women worldwide and in 20% of women in sub-Saharan Africa.1 Findings from observational studies reveal a linear, inverse relationship between maternal anemia and risk of maternal mortality across the entire distribution of hemoglobin concentrations, although confounding may be an issue.2,3 Severe anemia in pregnancy may result in maternal death due to cardiac failure. The current World Health Organization (WHO) guideline is to provide 30 to 60 mg of elemental iron and 400 µg of folic acid daily throughout pregnancy. This recommendation is mainly based on the proven effects of supplementation in reducing maternal anemia, iron deficiency, and low birth weight.4 In addition, approximately 35 million pregnant women, nearly all of whom live in sub-Saharan Africa, are at risk of Plasmodium falciparum infection annually.5 Across Africa, the prevalence of infection among children aged 2 to 10 years has declined from 26% in 2000 to 14% in 2013.5 Still, in 2013, an estimated 437 000 malaria deaths occurred in children younger than 5 years, representing 83% of all deaths due to malaria in Africa.5

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