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Editorial
September 22/29, 2015

Dextromethorphan and Quinidine for Treating Agitation in Patients With Alzheimer Disease Dementia

Author Affiliations
  • 1Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases, King’s College London, London, England
JAMA. 2015;314(12):1233-1235. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.10215

Among patients with Alzheimer disease, more than 90% experience neuropsychiatric symptoms during the course of their illness1 with agitation one of the most frequent and clinically important symptoms. Agitation is not only distressing for the patient but often confers risk both to patients and to others (such as family members and caregivers). Agitation also represents a common trigger for institutionalization and presents a major management challenge for clinicians. Effective treatment options for agitation in patients with Alzheimer disease are limited, so clinical innovation in this area is a high priority.

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