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August 5, 1933

British Experience with Unemployment Insurance: A Summary of Evidence Taken by the Royal Commission on Unemployment Insurance. Part V.: Financial Aspects.

JAMA. 1933;101(6):474. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740310058045

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Abstract

British Experience with Unemployment Insurance: A Summary of Evidence Taken by the Royal Commission on Unemployment Insurance. Part VI.: Economic and Social Effects. Monograph 12 in a Series on Social Insurance. Paper. Pp. 54. New York: Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, [n. d.].

These monographs give a compact survey of the exhaustive evidence taken and reports of the royal commission. There has been constant change in the direction of extension of benefits and expansion of coverage until deficits compelled some restrictions in 1931. The committee was forced to recognize that "it is impossible satisfactorily to base the current finances of a scheme of insurance against unemployment upon a theoretical estimate of the average rate of employment over a number of years." The question of meeting the deficits caused by the present depression received a number of answers, all admittedly unsatisfactory. There was much disagreement as to the economic effects on "mobility

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