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August 26, 1933

ACUTE DISSEMINATED ENCEPHALOMYELITISITS CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND SEQUELAE

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Department of Nervous Diseases, Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and the Cleveland City Hospital.

JAMA. 1933;101(9):667-672. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740340019005
Abstract

Probably nothing in contemporaneous neurology offers as many nosologic difficulties as the acute focusproducing diseases of the brain and spinal cord. There is much overlapping of symptomatology, and the pathologists do not agree on a satisfactory morphologic delineation. The bacteriology of many of these disorders is an unwritten chapter. It would appear from a study of such reports as those of Redlich,1 and of Flateau,2 which include a larger number of cases, that such conditions as myeloradiculitis,3 polyradiculoneuritis,4 acute benign infectious myelitis5 and possibly neuromyelitis optica aigue or ophthalmoneuromyelitis can safely be interpreted as subsyndromes within the protean manifestations of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Those who would keep out of the maze of recent controversies would do well to review the conservative and comprehensive discussion by Oppenheim6 in his textbook.

The twenty-eight cases reviewed in this series have been approached with this broad concept in

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