[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
December 13, 1930

THE PRENATAL TREATMENT OF SYPHILISWITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO EARLY SYPHILIS IN THE MOTHER

Author Affiliations

Professor of Dermatology and Syphilology, University of Michigan Medical School; Instructor in Dermatology and Syphilology, University of Michigan Medical School ANN ARBOR, MICH.

JAMA. 1930;95(24):1791-1795. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02720240001001
Abstract

On reviewing the literature regarding the question of syphilis and pregnancy, one is impressed by the statistical studies showing the marked reduction of fetal and neonatal death in which the disease is recognized and judicious treatment instituted. Bartholomew,1 comparing a series of 100 treated syphilitic pregnant women with 100 untreated, found premature births twice as frequent, stillbirths three times as frequent, abortion seven times as frequent, and infant deaths up to ten days after birth nine times as frequent in the untreated as in the treated patients. Armstrong2 found the stillbirth rate reduced from 24 per cent among the untreated mothers to 6.3 per cent in the treated cases. Ballantyne3 reported fetal and neonatal accidents in untreated cases to be 606 per thousand, as against 50.7 per thousand in treated cases. McCord,4 Williams,5 Welz and Van Nest,6 and others have reported more or less

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×