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December 13, 1930

Handbook of Therapeutics.

JAMA. 1930;95(24):1858. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02720240068036

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Abstract

That insufficiency in the teaching of therapeutics is an international calamity is indicated by testimony from Great Britain. In the preface, Campbell says: "The aim of the medical curriculum is to provide the student with sufficient knowledge to treat disease rationally; yet, as a rule, there is no part of his training with which the young graduate is more dissatisfied. He is taught pharmacology and therapeutics before he has had the opportunity of studying disease; he may even be instructed in therapeutics by one who, though possessing a medical degree, has not himself any experience of the practice of medicine. To some extent, no doubt, this is made good in the clinic, but it is too frequently the case that, when the history and physical signs have been elicited, the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and prognosis discussed, and the pathologic aspect of the disease fully considered, the all important question of

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