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Article
March 5, 1927

THE USE OF SOAP IN THE PROPHYLAXIS OF VINCENT'S INFECTIONS

Author Affiliations

Lieutenant Colonel, Medical Corps, U. S. Army NEW YORK; Captain, Medical Corps, U. S. Army FORT SAM HOUSTON, TEXAS

JAMA. 1927;88(10):716-719. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680360028010
Abstract

Vincent's infection may present itself in the mouth and pharynx as Vincent's angina or the more common condition, which has come to be known as trench mouth, or the two may be present together. It is an acute infectious disease, presumably due to the combined action of a spirochete and a fusiform bacillus. It is characterized clinically by inflammation and the formation of ulcerative lesions of greater or less magnitude located primarily on the mucous membrane of the gums, cheeks, uvula, tongue or tonsil; a variable degree of necrosis of the mucous membrane and contiguous tissues; the formation of a grayish membrane at the site of the lesion or lesions; constitutional disturbances varying with the severity of the infection, and enlargement of the adjacent lymph nodes.

Two clinical types are to be observed. The milder and more common form is slower in its progress, remains on the surface and does

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