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Article
January 3, 1931

THE RATE OF HEALING OF ELECTROSURGICAL WOUNDS AS EXPRESSED BY TENSILE STRENGTH

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Physiology and the Department of Experimental Surgery, Northwestern University Medical School.

JAMA. 1931;96(1):16-18. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02720270018004
Abstract

The interest in electrosurgery shown during the last decade is due to the development of several valuable electrosurgical knives. The novel features of these knives depend on technical improvements in construction providing for:

  1. A very high frequency oscillating current.

  2. The elimination of the irritating "sparking" or spark jumps of the older machines, which produced muscle jerking and varying degrees of injury to tissues. Sometimes even charring is produced, which is entirely different from the effect desired.

  3. Facility to modulate the currents very delicately, both in density and in penetration, so as to produce various effects on tissues, ascending a scale in tissue damage from the electrical incision, almost identical in regard to hemostasis and rate of healing with the wound of a scalpel, through grades of dehydration (or desiccation, to employ the term introduced by Clark 1), combined with incision, finally reaching the effect of coagulation.

In all these surgical

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