[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 9, 1927

ORAL LESIONS DUE TO VINCENT'S ANGINAWHAT EVERY PHYSICIAN AND DENTIST SHOULD KNOW ABOUT ITS RECOGNITION AND TREATMENT

JAMA. 1927;88(15):1142-1145. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680410018008
Abstract

Before trench warfare in France, in 1914, Vincent's angina was well recorded in the literature as a form of sore mouth. The organisms that cause the oral infection had been described, but a specific therapeutic agent had not been discovered. Apparently, it was a rare disease. Very few members of the medical profession and even fewer members of the dental profession were familiar with it.

In France, during the war, trench mouth was more common than were typhoid and malaria during the Spanish war, and the dentists in the medical corps of the army very quickly recognized it. In addition, they soon found that sodium perborate was a specific. Many other chemotherapeutic agents were employed, including the aniline dyes and some forms of arsphenamine intravenously.

When Dr. Norval H. MacDonald, a member of the dental corps of the army, returned from France, in 1919, he gave me a clear description

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×