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Article
December 9, 1933

PROGRESSIVE POSTOPERATIVE GANGRENE OF THE ABDOMINAL WALL FOLLOWING APPENDECTOMY

Author Affiliations

El Paso, Texas

JAMA. 1933;101(24):1876-1878. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.27430490001010
Abstract

Cases of postoperative or postinjectional gangrene of the skin of a progressive nature are so numerous in the literature that it is difficult to make a review of one certain variety, owing to the variation of nomenclature.

This report is limited to a progressive gangrene of the skin and subcutaneous tissues of the abdominal wall following laparotomies and chiefly following operations for ruptured appendixes. The latter condition is rather distinctive from closely related progressive gangrene elsewhere and presents so often the same characteristics that it can almost be classed as a clinical entity.

H. D., a man, aged 50, a postal clerk in a neighboring city, had had attacks of indigestion characterized by sour stomach, heartburn, constipation and headaches since childhood. The usual cathartics were resorted to with fair results. There was never a definite attack of appendicitis until the present illness. At the age of 24, he was sick

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