[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.211.213.149. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 30, 1933

METABOLIC ACTIONS OF DINITROPHENOLWITH THE USE OF BALANCED AND UNBALANCED DIETS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Departments of Medicine and of Pharmacology, Stanford University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1933;101(27):2099-2102. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740520009003
Abstract

Dinitrophenol (1-2-4) has been shown to increase promptly the metabolic rate in man and laboratory animals to almost any desired level. This action is peripheral, in the tissues, and independent of nervous and glandular functions. Small doses cause a slight increase in oxygen consumption; larger doses cause heat production that may surpass the ability of the animal to dissipate it, so that death occurs from heat rigor.1 We2 have suggested that, in proper dosage, dinitrophenol would be a potent therapeutic agent in obesity and in conditions in which a heightened metabolism might be desired. In a consideration of such possible uses the question arose of the source of the fuel for the increased metabolism. That is, dinitrophenol might promote the burning of carbohydrate, fat or protein, or all these fuels equally readily. A selective action on some one fuel appeared unlikely. An attempt was made, therefore, to study

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×