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Article
March 29, 1941

ROLE OF THE PHYSICIAN IN INDUSTRY IN THE CONTROL OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASES

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1941;116(13):1339-1342. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820130001001
Abstract

The prevention and control of acute disease of the respiratory tract is the most serious problem and at the same time the most urgent challenge that today confronts medicine in general and industrial medicine in particular. Although diseases and injuries of occupational origin have long claimed the chief interest and attention of physicians in industry, it is now well established and generally recognized that in their frequency and importance nonoccupational diseases far outweigh those conditions which arise from industry. The latter are chiefly responsible for the stupendous losses in both time and money to employer and employee alike that have already been so well emphasized. This is strikingly illustrated in a report made by Newquist of the American College of Surgeons, in which a comparison is drawn between time lost per employee annually from occupational diseases as compared with the loss from nonindustrial diseases and injuries among 352,591 workers employed

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