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March 29, 1941

INDUSTRIAL INJURIES TO THE EYEESSENTIALS OF FIRST AID AND LATERN MANAGEMENT

JAMA. 1941;116(13):1356-1357. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820130018005
Abstract

The physician who attends an industrial patient with an injured eye assumes a quadruple responsibility— to the patient, to the patient's employer, to the insurance carrier and to himself. Fortunately these interests are not antagonistic and can all be considered at once. Whatever affords the patient the quickest recovery with the least specific visual loss will also return him to work in the shortest time and reduce the insurance carrier's expense. By the same token, errors in judgment are expensive to the patient, the employer, the insurance carrier and, in the long run, the physician.

Although protection of the workman's eyes is to be discussed in another paper in this symposium, certain principles cannot be reiterated too frequently. Whenever it is possible to do so, rotating machinery should be shielded. An alert safety man can often erect shatterproof glass shields even on such machines as lathes and milling machines without

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