[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.161.128.52. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 17, 1934

HODGKIN'S DISEASE OCCURRING SIMULTANEOUSLY IN TWO BROTHERS

Author Affiliations

BUTTE, MONT.

JAMA. 1934;102(7):521-522. doi:10.1001/jama.1934.02750070019005
Abstract

The two most common diseases that cause a progressive glandular enlargement in youth are tuberculosis and Hodgkin's disease. Consequently the diagnosis often lies between these two. These conditions may resemble each other so closely in the early stages of glandular enlargement that the clinical diagnosis between them is almost impossible. Furthermore, there is no absolute evidence of inherited tendencies in Hodgkin's disease or of direct contagion, and the occurrence of more than one case in a single family is of the greatest rarity. The opposite is true of tuberculosis. In the literature are found only a few reports of Hodgkin's disease in more than one member of a family. In 1911 Ziegler1 stated that there were no recorded cases of the disease in parent and child and that no hereditary predisposition had been demonstrated. Cases in twins have been reported by Peacock1 and Senator.1 Degen1 saw

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×