[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.211.168.204. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 5, 1941

AN UNUSUAL REACTION TO THE BITE OF THE DOVE LOUSE FLY, STILBOMETOPA PODOPOSTYLA SPEISER

Author Affiliations

Stillwater, Okla.; Denver Assistant Professor of Medical Entomology, Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station, and Bacteriologist in Charge of the Branch Pathological Laboratory, Bureau of Animal Industry, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Respectively

JAMA. 1941;116(14):1517-1518. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.62820140003007a
Abstract

Entomologic and medical literature contain but few references to hippoboscid flies biting human beings, and we have found no instances of severe reactions following the bites of these insects. Brumpt1 stated that the injury is scarcely felt and that one must notice the engorgement of the fly's abdomen with blood to be sure of the bite. Moutier2 recorded the case of a servant girl who had been bitten by several louse flies, Crataerina pallida (Lat.) but mentioned only the lesions resulting from scratching. Hippobosca equina (Linn.), the forest fly, is known to feed on man in the absence of its normal host, but no records of severe reactions are available. Hippobosca camelina (Savigny) has a relatively painless bite but does leave a slightly itching pimple at the site of the bite. Brumpt fed Lipoptena cervi (Linn.) on himself but scarcely noticed the bite. The location of the bite

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×