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Article
April 5, 1941

DERMATITIS DUE TO DEXTRINS USED AS AN ADHESIVE ON TAX STAMPS

JAMA. 1941;116(14):1518. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.62820140004007b
Abstract

It is a fact that dextrin products used in numerous occupations, such as paper hanging and bookbinding, can often produce a dermatitis. What is not so well known, however, is that dextrin appearing on the adherent surfaces of stamps or labels can have the same effect. There are establishments in which employees affix tax stamps, by hand, to cigaret packages. Some of these workers do not have the opportunity to change the stamp water as frequently as it should be done. The continuous contact of the hands (and fingers) with the dextrin in the stamp water and with the cloths used to dry the excess fluid off the packages sometimes produces a dermatitis. Two such cases have come to our attention.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—  M. P., a woman aged 26, was employed in March 1938 to affix tax stamps. Two months later a dermatitis appeared on the palmar

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