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Article
July 9, 1927

THE RELIEF OF ITCHING BY EPINEPHRINE IN CERTAIN CASES OF INFANTILE ECZEMA

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Babies' and Children's Hospital and the Department of Pediatrics, Western Reserve University.

JAMA. 1927;89(2):110-111. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690020034010
Abstract

Every one who sees infants with eczema appreciates the extreme suffering they frequently manifest. The infant himself may not only rest and sleep very little but his constant fretting and crying deprive the other members of the family of their rest, so that it is not uncommon to have a mother state that she has not slept for weeks or even months, implying, of course, that she has had no uninterrupted restful sleep during that time.

One morning an infant in the hospital ward suffering from a severe form of eczema freed himself from restraint and manifested every evidence of extreme discomfort; he was given epinephrine intramuscularly; in two minutes he was quiet and in three minutes was asleep and slept for more than an hour. During the rest of the morning he seemed comfortable; the best he had been in the hospital, one of the attendants remarked.

Since this

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