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Article
April 26, 1941

HUMAN INFECTION WITH PASTEURELLA LEPISEPTICA FOLLOWING A RABBIT BITE

Author Affiliations

New Haven, Conn.
From the Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine and the Pediatric Service of the New Haven Hospital and Dispensary.

JAMA. 1941;116(17):1902-1903. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.62820170002008a
Abstract

We wish to describe an example of human infection with Pasteurella lepiseptica. The reason for making the report is that few such cases have been described and in this instance the source of infection was believed to be a rabbit.

In 1938 Lévy-Bruhl1 reviewed the literature in a discussion of pasteurellosis in man. Subsequent reports are as follows: Foerster2 found an organism with the properties of animal pasteurella in the pleural exudate and in the lungs in 2 cases of pneumonia; Mulder3 repeatedly isolated the organism from the sputum of a child with bronchiectasis; Plette4 cultured Pasteurella from the pleural fluid of a man with pleural and pericardial effusion and Le Chuiton, Bideau and Pennanéac'h5 recovered a strain from the spinal fluid of a patient with meningitis following a skull fracture.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.—  N. C., a white man aged 53, the caretaker

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