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May 24, 1941

FROZEN AND DRIED PLASMA FOR CIVIL AND MILITARY USE

Author Affiliations

BRYN MAWR, PA.
From the Clinical Laboratory, Bryn Mawr Hospital.

JAMA. 1941;116(21):2378-2382. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820210024004
Abstract

Recent experimental and clinical observations have definitely established the value of plasma as a substitute for whole blood in many clinical conditions.1 The use of plasma in place of whole blood is suggested by two independent lines of thought. The first is a critical appraisal of the clinical indications for blood transfusion based on the physiologic action of each one of its components; the second is a matter of technical convenience concerned mostly with the problems of preservation and administration.

We will consider these two elements separately and briefly.

CLINICAL CONSIDERATIONS  The accompanying table lists what we consider at present the indications for the use of plasma in place of whole blood as well as the conditions in which the use of whole blood is recommended.From the clinical standpoint it is also most essential to bear in mind that plasma properly prepared offers the following advantages:

  1. There

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