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Article
June 7, 1941

THE USE OF SURFACE ANESTHESIA IN THE TREATMENT OF PAINFUL MOTION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Fracture Service of the Presbyterian Hospital.

JAMA. 1941;116(23):2582-2583. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820230026008
Abstract

This paper describes a method of treatment for impaired function when pain is the factor responsible for the loss of motion or power. The treatment is the application of a surface anesthetic (ethyl chloride spray) combined with active motion.

DEVELOPMENT OF THE TREATMENT  In 1933 a gymnastic teacher—Heinz Kowalsky— suggested that treatment of sprains and pulled muscles by immobilization was not satisfactory to active sportsmen. He said that professional sportsmen had found by experience that immediate active motion after any such injury provided the quickest cure. He further told me that he usually advised his pupils to rub their injured joints with alcohol and expose them to live steam for a time. Numbness of the joint was said to result, and active motion was started as soon as this numbness set in. The result of this treatment was said to be satisfactory and superior to treatment by immobilization.I tried

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