[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 20, 1927

THE PROBLEM OF GRADUATE INSTRUCTION IN CLINICAL MEDICINE

JAMA. 1927;89(8):572-575. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690080004002
Abstract

The demands for graduate instruction in clinical medicine come from men engaged in general practice who desire to piece out the shortcomings in undergraduate preparation or who wish to keep abreast of more recent advances, and from those graduates in medicine who desire preparation for special practice. These are two quite distinct problems in medical education. The one calling for short review courses for men engaged in general practice has been met in part though not in a very satisfactory manner by work offered in postgraduate schools. The other, that of preparing men for special practice, has in this country received very little serious attention, and with the increasing tendency to specialization constitutes an outstanding problem in medical education. Men seeking preparation for special practice have usually had to rely on short, intensive courses suitable especially as review work for those in general practice, with the result that the special

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×