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June 14, 1941

Urban Housing and Crowding: Relation to Certain Population Characteristics as Indicated by National Health Survey Data

Author Affiliations
 

By Rollo H. Britten, Senior Statistician, and J. E. Brown, Assistant Statistician, U. S. Public Health Service. From the Division of Public Health Methods, National Institute of Health. Prepared by direction of the Surgeon General. Federal Security Agency, U. S. Public Health Service. Public Health Bulletin No. 261. Paper. Price, 15 cents. Pp. 123, with 5 illustrations. Washington, D. C.: Supt. of Doc., Government Printing Office, 1941.

JAMA. 1941;116(24):2732. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820240092040

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Abstract

The obvious is thoroughly demonstrated by diagrams and statistics in this study. It is proved beyond doubt that crowding is much worse in the lower than in the higher income class, among Negroes rather than white persons, with large families more than small, in residencies with low rentals rather than high, in rented greater than in owner occupied, and in general was less in the West than in the Northeast and South. Possibly a housing program might find some of these figures valuable, but they certainly reveal nothing new.

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