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Article
June 21, 1941

TOTAL THYROIDECTOMY IN THE TREATMENT OF DIABETES INSIPIDUS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Medical and Surgical Clinics of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

JAMA. 1941;116(25):2739-2745. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820250005002
Abstract

Considerable advance has been made in recent years in the physiology of the thyroid gland in relation to the other organs of internal and of external secretion. However, during the past forty-five years, clinicians have reported improved elimination of water in certain forms of nephritis by the administration of desiccated thyroid and more recently of thyroxine, alone or combined with solution of parathyroid.1 No explanation for the effects noted has been forthcoming beyond the possibility that these drugs increase the mobilization and excretion of calcium. Early work has shown that there is a definite relation between the thyroid and the pituitary gland. As early as 1889 Rogowitsch2 found alterations in the pituitary glands of thyroidectomized dogs and rabbits in the nature of an increase in certain elements in the glandular or anterior portion. Shortly afterward, Hofmeister,3 Gley,4 Pisenti and Viola,5 Schönemann6 and others reported

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