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Article
June 28, 1941

THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC LEUKEMIA BY SMALL DOSE ROENTGEN RAY TECHNIC

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.
From the Department of Radiology (Dr. Dowdy) and the Department of Medicine (Dr. Lawrence) of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and the Strong Memorial Hospital and Rochester Municipal Hospital.

JAMA. 1941;116(26):2827-2831. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820260001001
Abstract

Leukemia is one of the most fatal of all diseases. No known cure exists. Once the diagnosis is established there is no ultimate hope for the patient, and the attending physician finds small comfort in the palliative role that his therapy plays. There is perhaps no disease to which the human body is heir which has shown so little progress in response to therapeutic measures. There is a fairly general agreement that the life expectancy is little if any prolonged by any known therapeutic procedure. Roentgen therapy is the accepted method today, and if it is properly administered and adjusted in amounts and frequency the comfort and efficiency of the patient can be increased by approximately 60 per cent.1 If this cannot be accomplished, there is little justification for treatment. Acute leukemia should not be treated with roentgen rays, as there is seldom much response.

Despite the fact that

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