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August 27, 1927

INTERESTING ASPECTS OF A CASE OF CONGENITALLY ABSENT GALLBLADDER

Author Affiliations

New York Attending Gastro-Enterologist, Vanderbilt Clinic, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

JAMA. 1927;89(9):691-692. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.92690090001012
Abstract

This is a case of a congenitally absent gallbladder. It is worthy of report, first, because of its comparative rarity; secondly, because it indicates the closeness of the diagnostic relationship between biliary drainage and cholecystography, both of which were used in the course of the search for the source of the symptoms; and, thirdly, because it illustrates an interesting aspect of the mental process involved in making a diagnosis.

REPORT OF CASE  M. B., a married woman, aged 59, a multipara, had typhoid when she was 23, and, as its sequel, suffered a pain extending throughout the lower right extremity for many years. At 30 she had a "nervous breakdown," which continued for several months. The menopause came at 50, without vasomotor disturbance. At 53 she had influenza for several weeks.The illness in this case had a duration of four years. The chief complaints were an explosive

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