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Article
September 10, 1927

THE ANTITOXIN TREATMENT OF ERYSIPELASOBSERVATIONS IN ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-ONE PATIENTS AT BELLEVUE HOSPITAL

Author Affiliations

Director of Laboratories, Bellevue and Allied Hospitals; Adjunct Assistant Visiting Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital NEW YORK
From the Fourth Surgical Service, Dr. Carl G. Burdick, director, and the Third Surgical Service, Dr. George D. Stewart, director, Bellevue Hospital.

JAMA. 1927;89(11):880-882. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690110044015
Abstract

In the past twenty-three years, 15,277 cases of erysipelas were admitted to the isolation pavilion of Bellevue Hospital. During that time almost every conceivable form of treatment was practiced, most of it based on the application of local remedies. None of them appeared appreciably to shorten the course of the disease—and erysipelas, although commonly regarded as a self-limited process, seldom, in our experience at least, brings itself to an abrupt end, but is apt to pursue a leisurely course, sometimes consuming weeks. Within the past year, Birkhaug1 introduced the antitoxin treatment of erysipelas, employing it in a series of sixty cases with results that were astonishing. In Bellevue Hospital, which maintains, perhaps, the largest and most active erysipelas service in the world, we are now using the antitoxin treatment to the exclusion of other methods. As our first trial, we employed an unconcentrated product provided gratuitiously by the Lederle

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