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Article
August 9, 1941

THE EFFECT OF RENIN ON EXPERIMENTAL RENAL HYPERTENSION IN THE DOG

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Departments of Physiology and Physiological Chemistry, University of Illinois College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1941;117(6):416-422. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820320008003
Abstract

Of the numerous methods reportedly available for producing hypertension in animals1 (table 1), the most satisfactory is that of constriction of the renal arteries reported by Goldblatt2 in his now classic experiment. During the past several years, moreover, there has accumulated growing evidence of similarity between experimental renal (Goldblatt) hypertension in the dog and essential hypertension as found in the great majority of patients so diagnosed3 (table 2). Although a therapeutic agent which is effective in experimental renal hypertension may prove ineffective in essential hypertension, and vice versa, any new therapy proposed for essential hypertension should first receive an adequate trial in experimental renal hypertension. As a consequence, a number of attempts have been made to reduce the blood pressures of renal hypertensive dogs. Only a few of these efforts have met with some degree of success.

Thus Davis and Barker4 reported that potassium thiocyanate reduced

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