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The Art of JAMA
March 22/29, 2016

EveningKenneth M. Adams

JAMA. 2016;315(12):1212-1213. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.14177

The excitement of the brisk pace and glamorous environs that can characterize life in the big city seemingly could not compare with the simple glories of scenic northern New Mexico for Kenneth M. Adams (1897-1966). Although in his travels he could appreciate the energy of several urban artistic centers of the world, it was a setting in the vicinity of adobe dwellings near light-dappled mountains that he favored for his abode.

Born in Topeka, Kansas, Adams had an affinity for art already in his youth. He pursued lessons with local artist George M. Stone, who had studied abroad, and beginning in 1916, he availed himself of instruction at the Art Institute of Chicago. He returned to Kansas in the following year and in 1918 served in the military during World War I. The Kansan then headed to the East Coast to attend classes at the Art Students League of New York, starting in 1919. He also attended sessions of summer school over two years that were held in Woodstock, New York, under the tutelage of Andrew Dasburg, a proponent of modernism. Adams next traveled further afield, studying works in France and Italy and becoming involved in the painting of landscapes in Provence, returning home in 1923 (Coke VD. Kenneth M. Adams: A Retrospective Exhibition. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press; 1964:1-31).

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