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Article
June 2, 1934

VALUE OF GORDON'S TEST IN DIAGNOSIS OF MEDIASTINAL HODGKIN'S DISEASEREPORT OF TWO ILLUSTRATIVE CASES

Author Affiliations

Assistant in the Pathology Department of Edinburgh University; Assistant Pathologist, Royal Infirmary; Halley Stewart Research Fellow, Bacteriology Department of Edinburgh University EDINBURGH

JAMA. 1934;102(22):1842-1844. doi:10.1001/jama.1934.02750220020007
Abstract

Recently we1 reported a case in which the clinical and postmortem naked-eye observations were not conclusive of Hodgkin's disease. The efficacy of Gordon's2 test (1932-1933) as a means of diagnosing lymphadenoma was tried out with postmortem material obtained from this case. The test gave a positive result in favor of lymphadenoma and this was corroborated shortly after by microscopic examination of the tissues. The first case to be described here is similar but even more instructive, since it demonstrates the value of the new test as, a diagnostic procedure in circumstances in which not only the clinical and naked-eye observations but even histologic examination of the tissues left an element of doubt in the diagnosis. This case is also interesting in that it illustrates the change in cell structure which the Hodgkin's lesion may undergo in the course of two or three years. Finally there is appended a

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