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Article
October 8, 1927

Physical Therapy

JAMA. 1927;89(15):1243-1251. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690150053017
Abstract

THE INFLUENCE AND THERAPEUTIC USE OF EXTERNAL HEAT  PHYSIOLOGY AND USE IN INTERNAL MEDICINERALPH PEMBERTON, M.D.USE IN NERVOUS DISEASESTHEODORE H. WEISENBURG, M.D.USE IN SURGICAL AND ORTHOPEDIC CONDITIONSA. BRUCE GILL, M.D.USE IN DERMATOLOGYJAY F. SCHAMBERG, M.D. PHILADELPHIAThis is the first of the series of articles to be published by the Council for the purpose of setting forth the known merits and limitations of physical therapy.

PHYSIOLOGY AND USE OF HEAT IN INTERNAL MEDICINE  The use of external heat in the sense ordinarily understood by that term was a familiar therapeutic procedure to the ancients of Greece and Rome, who constructed elaborate establishments for the practice of hydrotherapy in various forms and also made use of naturally occurring thermal springs, such as those still frequented at Aix les Bains. Notwithstanding the application of heat to an increasing variety of conditions, the manner in which it accomplishes its purpose has been, until recently, poorly understood, chiefly owing to the fact that the actual conduct of most physical therapeutic measures has been in the hands of persons untrained in medicine.

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