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October 15, 1927

GENERAL PARALYSISTHE EFFECT OF NONSPECIFIC PROTEIN THERAPY ON THE BLOOD AND SPINAL FLUID

JAMA. 1927;89(16):1304-1308. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690160012004
Abstract

The favorable effects of fever on certain types of psychoses was known to Hippocrates and Galen, but it seems that Rosenblum,1 in 1875, was the first to inoculate purposely patients suffering from psychoses with febrile producing organisms. As early as 1854, Jacobi2 reported on the use of artificial abscesses in the treatment of general paralysis. In 1887, Wagner von Jauregg3 published a collected review of the influence of such diseases as cholera, typhoid, erysipelas and relapsing fever on psychoses, and proposed that one should intentionally imitate these experiments of nature for the cure of psychoses. This suggestion was realized by von Jauregg4 when, in the summer of 1917, he inoculated patients suffering from general paralysis with Plasmodium vivax, which he obtained from the blood of a soldier ill with malaria fever. Previous to this, von Jauregg and Pilcz5 treated general paralytic patients with Koch's old

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